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International Trade

Topics include United States trade policies and protectionism, the North American Free Trade area, trade and economic relations with industrialized countries, policies toward developing countries and multilateral institutions, macroeconomic policy coordination, and relations with Europe. Director of Undergraduate Studies consent required. Offered through Duke in New York Program. Pre-requisites: ECON201D. One course.

International Trade

Topics include United States trade policies and protectionism, the North American Free Trade area, trade and economic relations with industrialized countries, policies toward developing countries and multilateral institutions, macroeconomic policy coordination, and relations with Europe. Pre-requisites: ECON201D. One course.

Financial Institutions

Duke-in-NY Financial Markets and Institutions Program. The operations of commercial and central banking and non-banking financial institutions and instruments in the United States, determination of monetary aggregates and interest rates, the financial impacts of Treasury operations, and the linkages from Federal Reserve actions to price level, employment, economic growth, and balance of payments objectives. Coverage of models of monetary economics (for example the Cagan money demand function, cash in advance models). The dynamics and real effects of inflation. Instructor consent required.

Financial Institutions

The operations of commercial and central banking and non-banking financial institutions and instruments in the United States, determination of monetary aggregates and interest rates, the financial impacts of Treasury operations, and the linkages from Federal Reserve actions to price level, employment, economic growth, and balance of payments objectives. Coverage of models of monetary economics (for example the Cagan money demand function, cash in advance models). The dynamics and real effects of inflation. Pre-requisite: ECON210D or 372. One course.

The Economic and Political Performance of Civilizations

Critical survey of theories concerning the economic and political development of major civilizations, with an emphasis on the causes of differences that took shape and persisted over long time periods. The theories covered address the roles of institutions, cultures, legal systems, beliefs, family structures, religions, institutions, technologies, geography, and natural resources. Interactions between economic and political development. Pre-requisite: ECON201D, or instructor consent. One course.

Women in the Economy

Economics of gender including the status of women in the labor market; feminist economic theories; ethical considerations of gender-based inequalities; gendered division of labor within the family and between the household and labor market. Situation of women in developing countries under- going transition to market economies; gender-related measurements and indicators; explanations and remedies for female/male occupational segregation and wage differentials. Pre-requisite: ECON201D. One course.

African Economic Development

This course will seek to provide students with a realistic picture of African economies and societies today, emphasizing their heterogeneity and accomplishments, as well as focusing on reasons for continued widespread poverty throughout the continent. The course develops behavioral models that can be used to explain and predict household, market, and government behaviors and outcomes. Students are expected to quickly acquire basic stylized facts and economic models, and then analyze one of the many data sets now available. One course.

Urban Economics

Introduction to urban and spatial economics. Neoclassical monocentric city spatial model, patterns of land values, property prices, residential density and impact of distressed communities on broader development. Systems of cities and regional growth, role of cities in economic development. United States urban features: ethical and socio-economic effects of housing segregation and implications for discrimination. Tradeoffs between efficiency and fairness in housing resource allocation.

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