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Soviet and Post-Soviet Economic History

This course traces economic factors leading to the downfall of the Russian Empire and the rise of the USSR, followed by an assessment of the collapse of the USSR. Particular attention is devoted to the NEP period, earlier Soviet economic models, the famine of the 1930s, the impact of WWII, industrialization and urbanization, Soviet planning, and declining productivity growth and life expectancy in the in the 1970s and 1980s. The course then explores the economic consequences of the USSR's collapse as well as the nature of recovery in various countries that followed.

Computer Modeling

Introduction to the use of computer techniques in economic policy evaluation; policy applications to international economics, public finance and development economics; computer analysis of linearized and nonlinear models using Excel and GAMS. Students required to complete a major modeling project. Pre-requisites: ECON205D and 210D. One course / 3 units.

Computer Modeling

Introduction to the use of computer techniques in economic policy evaluation; policy applications to international economics, public finance and development economics; computer analysis of linearized and nonlinear models using Excel and GAMS. Students required to complete a major modeling project. Pre-requisites: ECON205D and 210D. One course / 3 units.

Course Syllabi

Urban Economics

Introduction to urban and spatial economics. Neoclassical monocentric city spatial model, patterns of land values, property prices, residential density and impact of distressed communities on broader development. Systems of cities and regional growth, role of cities in economic development. United States urban features: ethical and socio-economic effects of housing segregation and implications for discrimination. Tradeoffs between efficiency and fairness in housing resource allocation.

Honors Seminar II

Following ECON495S, iterative forum for conducting original research culminating in a substantive research project suitable for submission as an honors thesis. Pre-requisites: ECON205D and 210D. Consent of instructor required. One course.

Honors Seminar I

First course in two-semester honors sequence. Guided research on student-selected topics. Iterative presentations and writing assignments on current literature related to student-selected topics and of student-developed research proposals. Course requires completion of research proposal suitable for write-up as honors thesis in ECON496S. Pre-requisites: ECON205D, 208D and 210D. One course.

Environmental Justice: The Economics of Race, Place, and Pollution

Minorities, people of color, and low-income households bear a disproportionate burden from environmental pollution. Since the Clinton Administration, addressing environmental injustice has been among the policy objectives of the Environmental Protection Agency. Course examines how environmental injustices may arise out of discriminatory behavior and/or market forces founded on individual, firm, and government incentives.

Research Methods: Energy Markets/Environmental Impacts

Course accommodates students pursuing honors research, particularly with empirical focus. Topic of future honors research is student's choice; students develop research skills drawn from examples in energy and environment. Format includes empirical replication paper, oral presentations, short written critiques. Subject matter drawn from published research studies in the field of energy/environmental economics (both macro & micro).

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