Frank A. Sloan

Frank A. Sloan

J. Alexander McMahon Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Health Policy and Management

External Address: 
236 Social Sciences Bldg, Durham, NC 27708
Internal Office Address: 
Box 90097, Durham, NC 27708-0253
Phone: 
(919) 613-9358

Professor Sloan is interested in studying the subjects of health policy and the economics of aging, hospitals, health, pharmaceuticals, and substance abuse. He has received funding from numerous research grants that he earned for studies of which he was the principal investigator. His most recent grants were awarded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Center for Disease Control, the Pew Charitable Trust, and the National Institute on Aging. Titles of his projects include, “Why Mature Smokers Do Not Quit,” “Legal and Economic Vulnerabilities of the Master Settlement Agreement,” “Determinants and Cost of Alcohol Abuse Among the Elderly and Near-elderly,” and “Reinsurance Markets and Public Policy.” He received the Investigator Award for his work on the project, “Reoccurring Crises in Medical Malpractice.” Some of his earlier works include the studies entitled, “Policies to Attract Nurses to Underserved Areas,” “The Impact of National Economic Conditions on the Health Care of the Poor-Access,” and “Analysis of Physician Price and Output Decisions.” Professor Sloan’s latest research continues to investigate the trends and repercussions of medical malpractice, physician behavior, and hospital behavior.

Education

  • Ph.D., Harvard University 1969

Sloan, Frank A., Lindsey M. Chepke, and Dontrell V. Davis. “Race, gender, and risk perceptions of the legal consequences of drinking and driving.Journal of Safety Research 45 (June 2013): 117–25. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsr.2013.01.007. Full Text

Stein, Joshua D., Brian W. Hanrahan, Grant M. Comer, and Frank A. Sloan. “Diffusion of technologies for the care of older adults with exudative age-related macular degeneration.American Journal of Ophthalmology 155, no. 4 (April 2013): 688-696.e2. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2012.10.003. Full Text

Sloan, Frank A., Lindsey M. Chepke, Dontrell V. Davis, Kofi Acquah, and Phyllis Zold-Kilbourn. “Effects of admission and treatment strategies of DWI courts on offender outcomes.Accident; Analysis and Prevention 53 (April 2013): 112–20. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2012.12.033. Full Text

Sloan, Frank Allen, Linda Kaufman George, and Linyan Hu. “Emergency room and inpatient use after cardiac pacemaker implantation.The American Journal of Cardiology 111, no. 4 (February 2013): 563–68. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2012.10.043. Full Text

Sloan, Frank A., Elizabeth J. Gifford, Lindsey M. Eldred, Kofi F. Acquah, and Claire E. Blevins. “Do specialty courts achieve better outcomes for children in foster care than general courts?Evaluation Review 37, no. 1 (February 2013): 3–34. https://doi.org/10.1177/0193841x13487536. Full Text Open Access Copy

Sloan, F. A., A. C. Platt, L. M. Chepke, and C. E. Blevins. “Deterring domestic violence: Do criminal sanctions reduce repeat offenses?Journal of Risk and Uncertainty 46, no. 1 (January 18, 2013): 51–80. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11166-012-9159-z. Full Text

Ou, Yvonne, Daniel S. Grossman, Paul P. Lee, and Frank A. Sloan. “Glaucoma, Alzheimer disease and other dementia: a longitudinal analysis.Ophthalmic Epidemiol 19, no. 5 (October 2012): 285–92. https://doi.org/10.3109/09286586.2011.649228. Full Text

Day, Shelley, Kofi Acquah, Alyssa Platt, Paul P. Lee, Prithvi Mruthyunjaya, and Frank A. Sloan. “Association of vitamin D deficiency and age-related macular degeneration in medicare beneficiaries.Arch Ophthalmol 130, no. 8 (August 2012): 1070–71. https://doi.org/10.1001/archophthalmol.2012.439. Full Text

Chi, Sulene L., Kofi F. Acquah, Michael J. Richard, Paul P. Lee, and Frank A. Sloan. “Longitudinal evidence on punctal plug use in an elderly population.Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 28, no. 4 (July 2012): 289–93. https://doi.org/10.1097/IOP.0b013e31825ca599. Full Text

Sloan, Frank A., Kofi F. Acquah, Paul P. Lee, and Devdutta G. Sangvai. “Despite 'welcome to Medicare' benefit, one in eight enrollees delay first use of part B services for at least two years.Health Aff (Millwood) 31, no. 6 (June 2012): 1260–68. https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0479. Full Text

Pages